21 clever ways to reduce the dust in your home

If you often find yourself sneezing, have watery eyes or wheeze in your own home, you may have a dust mite allergy. We’ve put together a list of 21 ways for you to reduce the dust in your house.

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1. Change your bedding

Change those sheets! Photo credit: .matter.
Change those sheets! Photo credit: .matter.

Your dear old bed collects skin flakes and dust with ease. Wash your bedsheets and pillowcases weekly to help combat the dust. Get the pillows dry cleaned or wash them yourself.

2. Vacuum regularly
Vacuum your house to help suck up all the dust, especially high traffic areas like hallways and living rooms. Look out for vacuum cleaners with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters which are supposed to remove 99.9% of pollen, animal dander and bacteria from the air.

3. Sweep the floors
If there are areas where you don’t need to vacuum, use a broom and dustpan to sweep the floors. Wash your dustpan and brush every few months and let them air-dry before storing.

4. Mop the floors
A wet mop will collect the dust that you missed after sweeping. The longer you leave it, the harder it will be, so give it a go today!

5. Get a dehumidifier
A dehumidifier will help reduce the levels of humidity in the house and is one of the best ways to help dust mite control. There are lots of different types of dehumidifiers available including the Pro Breeze 500ml Compact which I’ve just ordered myself.

6. Beat cushions & rugs

Give them a good beating. Photo credit: Deidre Woollard
Give them a good beating.
Photo credit: Deidre Woollard

Use an old broom handle or a carpet beater to beat your cushions and rugs. Continue to do so until you no longer see any dust flying off them.

7. Use a microfiber cloth
Grab a microfiber cloth to use on all your furniture and surfaces. These cloths have more fibers that are able to attach themselves to the smallest dirt particles – meaning they make dusting light work.

8. Groom pets
Keep an eye on pet fur and dander by regularly brushing your pets. When picking a place to brush them, choose a tiled or stone floor that’s easier to clean.

9. Air purifiers
Trap all those nasty dust particles with an air purifier and store them close to windows. This will prevent airborne contaminants getting in and circulating the room.

10. Clean air ducts & vents
Dirty air vents can build up a dust, dirt and grime layer. Give it a good clean and this will improve ventilation.

11. Sort out your toys

To the box with you all!
To the box with you all!

If your child is sensitive to dust then it’s a good idea to keep toys out of their bedroom. Buy washable toys, made out of wood, rubber or plastic, and store them in a big box so dust won’t get in.

12. Look after your wardrobe
Store any clothes, bags or items that you aren’t using plastic containers or cloth bags to keep the dust away. Visit 21 brilliant hacks for your tiny wardrobe to learn how to make the most of your space.

13. Keep the windows shut on windy days
Here’s a good tip if you have a lot of dust in your house – keep your windows closed on windy days!

14. Use dust covers
Cover any appliance while you’re not using it, such as computer keyboards. This will help stop dust before it gets into tiny places.

15. Remove your shoes
As soon as people get in your home, ask them to take off their shoes. Any dirt on the bottom of their footwear that gets trodden into the house will eventually turn into dust when it dries.

16. Get a doormat

Come in, Go away diootmat, from Amazon.co.uk
Come in, Go away diootmat, from Amazon.co.uk

Prevent outside dirt from coming into the home by getting a doormat and leaving it outside your home. Make sure to wash the mats to help prevent the dirt from building up. Here’s a great doormat from SUCK UK available at Amazon.co.uk for £16.25.

17. Install roller blinds
Instead of curtains why not try roller blinds? These are much easier to remove and clean, or try cloth curtains which are easily washed in the washing machine.

18. Clean the tumble dryer
Check your lint collector and clean the dirt and dust from it. This will help the tumble dryer and prevent dust from flying around every time you open the door.

19. Get rid of bits & bobs
If you’ve got a cluttered home, chances are all your knick-knacks are gathering dust. Check out these 35 things you really don’t need & should get rid of NOW.

20. Limit the textiles in your home
Textiles trap and create dust as they disintegrate when you use them. Try lightweight curtains, furnishings and try and reduce blankets and other materials around the home.

21. Get a wooden floor

Dusting made easy! Photo credit: eatmorechips
Dusting made easy!
Photo credit: eatmorechips

Carpet holds a lot of dust and each time you take a step on it, it releases dust. If you’re truly set on reducing the dust in your home consider installing a wooden floor, or another hard surface like stone, tile or vinyl flooring.

Phew, what a lot of ways to reduce dust. If you’ve got a tip we might not know about, let us know in the comments below, we’d love to hear them!

Editor

Lifelong biscuit addict. Obsessed with recipes, cooking & eating. Slightly lazier than the average bear, so likes writing about life hacks & discovering the quickest / easiest way to do things.

  1. 1 Helen Reply

    Sticky lint rollers are my top tip for removing pet hair from clothing and furnishings, my beloved cats and dog all love my bed, which is fine but I can’t bare the fur they leave behind, I use my lint roller several times a day but it’s quick and easy, it also reduces the amount of fur that eventually ends up on the floor, I buy refills in bulk online so it’s a fairly low cost for a huge benefit, I highly recommend. ~^..^~

  2. 5 Tina Rayner Reply

    HELEN: I’ve been having this problem especially trying to remove the cat hair from my black quilt cover and sheets! Thank you for sharing this tip.

  3. 6 Tina Rayner Reply

    Another way to remove dust from house plants, especially larger ones is to lightly brush over the leaves with an old make up brush! I use a soft large sized powder brush ☺

  4. 8 Debbie Reply

    I agree with most of this, but have to say I find it annoying when people ask me to remove my shoes when I enter their houses. Obviously, if they’re very muddy or wet it’s only common politeness and consideration, and if a doormat is there it should most definitely be used. Maybe this stems from once having an embarrassing experience when I was asked to remove my shoes and had a blinking great hole in my tights!!

      1. 10 Alex Reply

        Hello. My wife is from Japan, the land of no shoes in the house. I am from the mid-west country where I grew up with shoes everywhere. I will have to say this though, there is one thing my wife side that convinced me that shoes off in the house is a good practice, and I will repeat here what she said to me that changed me forever. With shoes you have on that you are about to walk into a house with, do you also use them to walk into public restrooms? That comment and image alone forever changed me.

        1. 11 Stephanie C Reply

          Hi Alex. Wow, this is a very interesting thought and something I’ve never considered before. It’s shoes off for me in the future!
          Thanks for sharing 🙂

  5. 12 theresia Guschlbauer Reply

    Hi Colleen,
    I don’t understand how you can advise keeping the windows shut. Where I come from, my grandparents used to as a matter of hygiene, open the widows wide to ‘air’ the room, no matter what time of the year! Fresh contains a lot of oxygen which is essential to humans. As air comes into the room, it mixes with the stale air in the room and takes its place, taking some of the dust away with it! In fact I cannot sleep without the window open. The lack of fresh air is no doubt responsible for the modern epidemic of ‘dust-related’ illnesses.

    1. 13 Colleen B Reply

      Hi Theresia, thank you so much for your comment. I will change my tip to say that only when there are high levels of pollen, should you close your windows.

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