How To Clean A Kettle (Get Rid Of Limescale FAST!)

How To Clean A Kettle (Get Rid Of Limescale FAST!)


Hot beverages, porridge, and hot water bottles - we use our tea kettles more than we realise! If you think you can get away without knowing how to clean a kettle, you're wrong. Just take a peek inside the lid to see what horrors are lurking at the bottom!

If you don't keep up with kettle maintenance on a regular basis, it won't boil as quickly and could even end up breaking over time. It's better for the environment - and your bank balance - if you keep it clean. Let's not even mention the limescale flakes that could end up in your drinks.

But how exactly do you clean a kettle?

Today we're sharing the best, natural methods to help you do it right the first time. 

What is limescale? 

limescale
Our kettle really needed cleaning!

Limescale is a white deposit that's also known as calcium carbonate - it's the reason your kettle needs regular cleaning.

Limescale is found in places where hot water has evaporated and some of the remaining deposit has solidified. You might have also seen it on old pipes, water tanks, and central heating systems. It's especially common in hard water areas because the water is high in dissolved magnesium and calcium.

How often should you clean your kettle? 

Your kettle needs cleaning and descaling regularly. We recommend that you: 

  • Clean the outside of the kettle once a fortnight, or as needed. 
  • Treat limescale once a month - if you live in a hard water area, you might want to do this more frequently. 

How to descale your kettle

1. Descale your kettle with vinegar

vinegar
The results will blow you away!
  • Start by filling your kettle to the maximum line with equal parts water and white vinegar
  • Boil the kettle and leave the mixture to soak for an hour.
  • Pour out the mixture and rinse the inside of the kettle with clean water.
  • If the limescale remains, repeat the process. You could add more vinegar than water depending on the severity of the limescale.
  • If there is still some limescale, use a sponge or cloth to gently scrub it off. Don't scrub at the heating element or you could damage your kettle.
  • Rinse and boil the kettle with clean water until the smell is gone.

TOP TIP: Make sure to unplug the kettle or inform everyone in your household that you're in the middle of cleaning, or they could be left with a bad taste in their mouth! 

2. How to use lemon to descale your kettle

  • Fill your kettle with clean water to just below the maximum line. 
  • Squeeze the juice of a lemon into the kettle. 
  • Cut up the remaining lemon into smaller pieces and add to the water. 
  • Boil the kettle with the lemon and water inside. Leave the mixture to soak for 1 hour. 
  • Rinse the kettle with clean water, making sure to remove any remaining lemon.

3. Using bicarbonate of soda to clean a kettle

baking soda
Not just for baking!
  • After following any of the above methods, you could take an extra step and sprinkle a few tablespoons of baking soda into the kettle. 
  • Leave the baking soda to sit at the base for a few minutes.
  • Use a soft cloth to wipe the inside of the kettle clean and then rinse. 

TOP TIP: You can also use baking soda in place of lemon or vinegar. Use approximately 2 tablespoons stirred into a full kettle of clean water and bring to boil.  

4. Will coco cola descale a kettle? 

Most of us will have heard of the wondrous cleaning powers of coca cola, but did you know that it can also be used to descale your kettle? It contains carbonic acid, which is really powerful when it comes to fighting limescale.

  • Fill your kettle with coca cola and boil. 
  • Leave to stand for 30 minutes.
  • Rinse thoroughly to remove any smells. 

5. How to clean a kettle with citric acid 

Citric acid can be bought for use as a commercial cleaning ingredient. It is best known for its descaling properties. It's no wonder that people love to use it to clean their kettles, dishwashers, washing machines and more! 

To use citric acid on your kettle, follow these steps: 

  • Fill your kettle until it's about halfway full. 
  • Boil the kettle and then unplug it from the power source. 
  • Add 2 tablespoons of citric acid to the water inside of the kettle.
  • Use the spoon to stir the powder into the water. Take care, it will be hot! 
  •  Leave the mixture to sit in your kettle for at least 20 minutes. 
  • Once 20 minutes have passed, empty the mixture out and rinse the kettle.

6. Clean the filter

filter
So clean!

Don't forget to clean your filters. A lot of limescale gets caught up here! 

  • If the filter is removable, pop it in a glass of white vinegar for 20 minutes.
  • Use a scrubber to clean off any limescale. 

How to clean the outside of your kettle 

Cleaning the outside of your kettle should be done more regularly than descaling. You should try to do it at least every fortnight to remove any grime or marks. 

  • Spray a cloth with an antibacterial, multi-purpose cleaner. 
  • Wipe the kettle to remove residue. 
  • For stainless steel kettles, you can use baby oil or olive oil to give it a sparkling, streak-free finish. Just buff in a small amount with a clean, dry cloth. 
  • Make sure to clean the spout after you've descaled the kettle. The steam from boiling the kettle will have worked it's magic to loosen up the limescale - it'll just need a quick wipe. 

TOP TIP: If you're cleaning an electric kettle, take care to keep the electrical elements and sockets dry at all times. 

Preventing limescale buildup in the future

1. Don't overfill your kettle

watering plants
Don't let it go to waste!

Standing water leads to deposits over time. Leave remaining water to cool and then pour onto plants to stop it going to waste. 

2. Filter your water

You might be able to reduce deposits by only filling your kettle with water that has been filtered, or by using a kettle that has a filter in it. Kettles with built-in filters might not filter your water, but they will stop limescale flakes from going into your drinks! 

3. Keep up with regular cleaning

regular cleaning
It doesn't matter how - just keep on top of it!

Even if your kettle looks clean and limescale free, prevention is always the best method. Make sure to keep up with regular cleaning so that you don't end up overwhelmed with a difficult deep clean. 

4. Get a kettle descaling ball 

These nifty little wire balls can be popped into your kettle to ensure that limescale is collected before it has a chance to settle at the bottom. You can remove the ball periodically to rinse off the limescale and reuse. 

 
Q&A

How do you get rid of the metal taste in a kettle? 

It's quite normal to experience a metallic taste from a brand new kettle. Normally this will go away over time and if you boil a few kettles full of water first. If the metallic taste lingers, try using the bicarbonate of soda method listed above. 

Can you boil an egg in a kettle? 

You certainly can! This fun hack isn't the most practical idea because, if the egg cracks, you'll have quite the cleaning job on your hands. It's also not advised to drink the water that the eggs have cooked in, as you don't know what debris might come loose from the shells! We'd stick to a pan on the stove if we were you. 

What happens if I boil an empty kettle? 

This depends on the kettle but, with an older model, you could end up damaging the heating element. Some kettles will automatically switch off if there is no water inside. This is an added safety feature. 

Can I remove rust from a cast iron kettle? 

We have a handy guide that'll help you to remove rust from anywhere and everywhere, and cast iron kettles are no exception! Coca-cola is particularly good for removing rust, so give that a go. 

How much does it cost to boil a kettle of water? 

According to Npower, the average kettle costs 2p to boil. 

Can I use these tips on a plastic kettle? 

Yes - these tips are equally suited to use on a plastic kettle. 

 

 

Have you got any more handy hints for cleaning your kettle? Let us know in the comments below! 
Author

Joanne A

Editor

Expert in finding beautiful solutions for small and rented spaces. Would happily spend the rest of my life shopping for homewares and watching Disney movies - I only wish I had Cinderella's army of mice to help me clean!

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  1. Author Damasa on May 22, 2019 at 9:08 am

    Citric acid is also very effective.

    1. Author Joanne A on May 22, 2019 at 9:28 am

      Thanks for sharing, Damasa!

    Reply
  2. Author alison willis on May 22, 2019 at 9:09 am

    Very important to boil only the amount of water you need - kettles use a surprising amount of electricity to work so quickly, which means 2 things - it costs a lot and more importantly - it causes CO2 to be produced. A sensible thing to do is measure the amount of water you need in the mug then pour it into the kettle...

    1. Author Joanne A on May 22, 2019 at 9:10 am

      That's a great idea, Alison!

    Reply

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